poc-creators:

Filmmaker Frances Bodomo won FOUR GRANTS, count em up FOUR at Sundance yesterday, totaling what looks like $25,000  to pull together a full length production of her short film Afronauts which premiered in  in the short film competition.  The sponsoring companies and organizations  were Kodak, Technicolor, the 2014 Women in Film/Calm Down Productions and Entertainment Partners.  Afronauts is a 13 minute black and white film that:

Afronauts tells the alternative history of the 1960s Space Race. It’s the night of July 16th, 1969 and, as America prepares to send Apollo 11 to the moon, a group of exiles in the Zambian desert are rushing to launch their rocket first. There’s only one problem: their spacegirl, Matha, is five months pregnant. Afronauts follows characters that have not been able to find a home on earth and are therefore attracted to the promise of the space race.

All information is via her twitter account @tobogganeer  (she has a tumblr of the same name) and  Powder Room Films  CONGRATULATIONS.

THIS IS IMPORTANT NEWS!

(via paradiseprogram)

frances bodomo / afronauts / women in film / film history / sundance / movies / film / filmmaking / indie lookout / indie / women of color / poc / african american filmmakers / african american / Black women / Black filmmakers / space / astronaut /

4824 Notes 0

women in film / documentary / indie / independent filmmakers /

6 Notes 0

Trailer for Inside The Circle (2007), dir. by Marcy Garriott

"Capturing the raw power of a grassroots hip-hop movement, INSIDE THE CIRCLE tells the story of two strikingly talented b-boys, Josh and Omar, former best friends who become dance floor rivals. Immersed in the b-boy culture of defiant creativity, Omar rises to international renown, while Josh tangles with the law. Both of them struggle to keep dance at the center of their lives, and the "B-Boy City" competitive events thrown by visionary street dancer Romeo Navarro serve as emotional milestones in their journey to adulthood. Facing off in intense dance battles that mirror the larger events in their lives, Josh and Omar seek meaning and identity "inside the circle." As Romeo aptly observes: "If you can hold yourself down in battle, you can hold yourself down in life.""
- written by Marcy Garriott, taken from the website

I haven’t seen this yet but I’m super-interested, especially considering a huge part of my job right now is to figure out how to integrate dance into MashPlant’s content. I’m a huge fan of urban-based performance arts - this weekend, we’re shooting Chicago’s Louder Then A Bomb slam poetry finals - so I’m all over break dancing and dance films.  

Also, Garriott is an independent female filmmaker whose interest in Austin’s breakdance scene helped her gain an in, and she’s made what looks to be a pretty poignant and ambitious documentary. I’m all about it.

2000s / b-boy / b-girl / break dancing / dance / documentary / independent / women in film / film /

1 Notes 0

support independent film / independent / jillian iscaro / women in film /

11 Notes 0

Presenting: POX Episode 1: Cyberspies (2003), dir. by Lisa Hammer

This isn’t exactly a film, but an introduction to the work of underground multi-disciplinary, multi-media visionary Lisa Hammer. A prolific staple of NYC avant-garde, Lisa’s work spans from rock operas to silent films to musical acts encapsulating all levels of morbid. Her most well-known collaborators include the wild and witchy Dame Darcy and a man many of you know as the creator of the show The Venture Brothers: Doc Hammer.
Actually, if you’re familiar with The Venture Brothers, then you already know of Lisa; she contributes to the show frequently as the voice of Triana Orpheus.

I absolutely love Lisa’s work, and POX stands out as one of my favorites in her portfolio. Variety shows have always been a point of interest for me, so naturally POX just furthers my desire to produce one of my own. It also displays a high level of collaboration with Doc Hammer, who was not only in three bands with Lisa (in which he contributed vocals and played a wide variety of instruments), but also acted in many of her works and provided animation via AstroBase Go!. Pretty cool to be able to see what artists were doing and what they looked like prior to whatever they’re on today.

Basically, POX is damn clever in its production and absolutely hilarious in execution - POX himself (played by an enigmatic creature called “Alizarinkryz”) is so spot-on, I doubt he’s even acting. He simply is, he simply be, he is divine.

If you’re into all things ~*~*darque*~*~ and ~*~*spooky cute*~*~, you’d definitely love everything this woman creates, especially in conjunction with Dame Darcy, though I feel to categorize Lisa Hammer’s work as such is to belittle it. This ain’t entry-level alt, this ain’t Hot Topic brand. Her usage of period settings and the macabre only heightens the eroticism and taboo nature of her subjects; chaste, but sensual nonetheless, with the slightest touch of mirth. Also, it takes a high reference level and a bit of practice to produce a convincing silent-era silent film, and Lisa’s managed at least a dozen.

P.S. - degenerates denizens of FaceBook can follow The Pox Show [here], and vote for POX for president in 2012 [here]. You can also check out Lisa Hammer’s YouTube channel for more of her work by double-clicking the video above.

2000s / animation / independent / inspiration / lisa hammer / multi-media / nyc / television / the pox show / underground / women in film / doc hammer / mors syphilitica /

8 Notes 0

A belated remembrance of Tura Satana

It was on the 4th that I remembered that Filmme Fatale’s avatar was of the timeless, sultry Tura Satana. Before Tura it was a photo of me, and I realized that I didn’t want FF to be seen as a personal blog; my admiration for Satana had been cemented ever since I saw her powerful performance in Russ Meyers’ cult classic Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!!, so the choice was an easy one. I’m sorry - to myself the most, really - that I haven’t yet written about Tura’s influence on me.

Any Wikipedia search could tell you about Tura’s career and her life. It’s common knowledge that she was raped, that she grew up and tracked down her assaulters and beat up each and every one. It’s common knowledge that she was an exotic dancer, an actress, a singer, a muse, and turned down a marriage proposal from Elvis Presley.
Tura was a force, in life and in show biz. An adolescent girl-gang leader, a teenage runaway, an underage nude model. I’d say she was a bad seed if not for that strong, clear head on her shoulders. Maybe “badd seed”? People still say “badd,” don’t they? Oh - did I mention she’s a Chicago girl?

But what struck me most of all was just how positive Tura was about strong females. In her interview with Zuri Zone [link], Satana states that while she and her friends were in a girl gang, “…we didn’t go around looking for trouble. Usually we went looking to prevent trouble, especially to other girls.” She carried this sentiment with her ‘til the day she died, during a time where women (especially Asian women) had no strong female role-models who took charge of their sexuality.
Even now, we still need Tura’s rage-filled Varla from Faster, Pussycat!, and her ruthless Satana from The Astro-Zombies. Even now, Tura is revolutionary in seeing women as both strong and feminine, as capable of both integrity and sexuality, of owning their autonomy.

Though her entire life seemed to be a struggle to overcome her many adversities - growing up Asian-American, hitting puberty much earlier than her peers, brutal sexual assault, harassment and even violence throughout her entertainment career - Satana is a symbol of strength and self-assuredness in a world that remains sympathetic to men. Her humor was said to be infectious, her beauty statuesque, and her work ethic was limitless. And despite her notorious piercing glare, she was known by all to be a very fair, grounded woman.

Even now, “Tura” - a sigil to those who did not know her personally - is an incredibly powerful woman.

Though the film world mourns her death, I mourn her more as a woman. To close her interview with Zuri Zone, Tura states, “Remember that life is not like movies. There is good and bad all around. Make sure you are never a victim but always a survivor.”



favorite / feminism / tura satana / women in film /

33 Notes 0

iscaro:

*If this seems like a film you would want to see, I would appreciate reblogging to help spread the word.

Hey Guys,

As some of you know, I’m working on a film called DEADHAND.  This is my senior thesis film and it’s going to be feature length; some of you may have seen some of the test footage / concept art I’ve been posting in the last few months.  We start shooting soon and are using a combination of 16mm and 35mm film, but I need to raise some additional funds for post-production (film development and transfer).  The above video is a teaser.

I’ve made a Kickstarter (click here) to help fund the post-production of this project.  Basically, you pledge a certain amount, and each amount comes with incentives.  The catch is, if I don’t raise the money, I keep nothing and no one is charged.  This is to ensure that no one gets ripped off.  Here is the list of incentives:

$5+  A signed postcard of a screenshot from the film.

$10+  A signed 11”x14” print of a drawing or photography by me of your choice + all of the above.

$20+  A signed copy of the completed film + all of the above.

$40+  Bonus features dvd + an invitation to the premiere + all of the above.

$75+  An exclusive comic book version illustrated by me + all of the above.

$150+  Special Thanks in the credits + all of the above.

$500+  Associate Producer credit + a prop or costume + all of the above.

$1000+  Producer credit + a strip of original negative from the film + all of the above.

$2000+  Executive Producer credit + an exclusive line of prints and concept art + all of the above.

100% of funds will go directly to film development and transfer costs.  As a special incentive, the first funder gets all of the rewards regardless of the amount, minus the credits.

SYNOPSIS:  DEADHAND follows the story of Itagaki, an ex-scientist, in the search for his missing wife Josephine.  Along the way, he teams up with Maria, a young Hispanic prostitute who had a life-altering encounter with Josephine: they traded arms. 

It is revealed that Josephine has a complete robo-prosthetic body; only her brain is human.  In an attempt to regain her full human form, Josephine offers Maria money and freedom from her life of prostitution in exchange for her human body.  Maria, questioning her own humanity, agrees to do it. 

The surgery does not go according to plan:  the unskilled, crooked scientist performing the operation can only successfully transplant their arms.  Maria has lost contact with Josephine and the scientist when Itagaki shows up at her brothel.  She agrees to help him with the hope that he will be able to complete the operation.  However, things go awry when Maria develops feelings for Itagaki and discovers the mysterious circumstances that led to her own birth and the creation of Josephine’s body.

THEMES:  DEADHAND is in Japanese, English and Spanish.  One of the things I want to accomplish with this film is an implicit breakdown and critique of the representation of women and minorities and the over sexualization of youth in media.  Other themes include mental-physical integration, the limits and morality of science, cultural diffusion, free will vs biology, simulation as valid experience, and the disappearance of the original in the digital world.

PRODUCTION:  We start shooting in mid February and wrap mid April.  You can expect a finished product around August 2011.

Questions / comments?  Click my “ask” button or e-mail me at iscaro.jillian@gmail.com or deadhandfilm@gmail.com.  You can also check out the film’s website at deadhand.net

If this sounds like a movie you want to see, please reblog and thank you to everyone who has been helping me so far through reblogging, liking and commenting on other posts about this project.  :)

Click here to go to the Kickstarter page

Jillian Iscaro is a multi-media artist whose work I greatly admire. Anyone who’s interested in her work should definitely check her out. If you have a couple bucks to spare, toss ‘em her way!

Support independent film!

independent filmmakers / women in film / important / jillian iscaro /

25 Notes 0

feministfilm:

filmme-fatale:

feministfilm:

fuckyeahdirectors:

Sofia Coppola

OH HAY EVERYBUDY IT’S ME SOFIA COPPOLA! U KNOW, THE ONLY FEMALE DIRECTOR WHO HAS EVER LIVED!?!?!

Really, feministfilm?? Snarking on a successful female filmmaker’s career by implying that she is responsible for the narrow-minded popular opinion is the slut-shaming of the directorial world. I don’t follow you to see stuff like this; this isn’t what you stand for, and this definitely isn’t what I stand for.
HEAVEN FUCKING FORBID a female director be popular enough to mindlessly name-drop ad nauseaum like her male counterparts.

Oh, shit, no! I don’t mean to snark on Coppola. It just bums me out that I complained forever about how there were no women on fuckyeahdirectors, and then all of a sudden there were women on fuckyeahdirectors, but then about 100% of those women ended up being Sofia Coppola. This was a terrible attempt on my part at using humor to snark on fuckyeahdirectors without making fuckyeahdirectors hate me even more than it probably already does.
I think she’s a talented director, even if she benefits from a incredible amount of privilege. I largely enjoy her film oeuvre. And I acknowledge that just because I’m having the worst day ever doesn’t really excuse me being grammatically ambiguous in a way that’s potentially hurtful to someone who doesn’t deserve it. I apologize to you and everyone else who was offended by this.

I’m so glad I misunderstood you!
You should do a spam of female directors, y’know, be the change you want to see, etc etc. Make it better than those typical, boring picture posts by including mini-bios and links to view their works. I’d love to contribute to that :D
I’ll start with:
Katrina Del Mar (because I haven’t written about her enough)This “wild woman”, hailed as “the Lesbian Russ Meyer,” is a New York-based art and commercial photographer, as well as an award winning filmmaker and video artist. Her first film, Gang Girls 2000,  shot entirely on super 8mm film, received a  4 ½ star review in Film  Threat Magazine, and received glowing reviews from the press, even  inviting comparisons to the legendary Kenneth Anger. The follow up, Surf Gang about a gang of women surfers from Rockaway Beach in New York City, landed Katrina a prestigious Fellowship in Video from the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) and Best Experimental Film Award from the Planet Out Short Movie Awards announced at the Sundance Film Festival in 2006.(She has since filmed another gang-girl-centric film, Hell On Wheels: Gang Girls Forever, featuring “Homeless Skateboarders, pacifist rollerskaters, vegan animal-activist bikers, dyslexics and more! EVERYTHING ON WHEELS!”)In late 2006 Katrina del Mar landed a dream job serving as studio manager for legendary art photographer Nan Goldin, who has described Katrina’s work as “radical” and “ground-breaking.” Her client list also includes Sony Music, Island  Records, Polygram, V2 Records, London Records, Time Out New York, People  Magazine, Alternative Press, Mademoiselle, and the NYPostAs an artist, Katrina del Mar has shown her  work at The Museum for Contemporary Art in Bordeaux, France, Deitch  Projects, American Fine Arts Company, Binz 39 in Switzerland, the Bass  Museum of Art in Miami, the Miami Light Project, P.S. 122 in New York  City, and the University of Cardiff in Wales.
Check out her website here, and peep the trailer for Gang Girls 2000 on her YouTube channel.
What do you guys have?

feministfilm:

filmme-fatale:

feministfilm:

fuckyeahdirectors:

Sofia Coppola

OH HAY EVERYBUDY IT’S ME SOFIA COPPOLA! U KNOW, THE ONLY FEMALE DIRECTOR WHO HAS EVER LIVED!?!?!

Really, feministfilm?? Snarking on a successful female filmmaker’s career by implying that she is responsible for the narrow-minded popular opinion is the slut-shaming of the directorial world. I don’t follow you to see stuff like this; this isn’t what you stand for, and this definitely isn’t what I stand for.

HEAVEN FUCKING FORBID a female director be popular enough to mindlessly name-drop ad nauseaum like her male counterparts.

Oh, shit, no! I don’t mean to snark on Coppola. It just bums me out that I complained forever about how there were no women on fuckyeahdirectors, and then all of a sudden there were women on fuckyeahdirectors, but then about 100% of those women ended up being Sofia Coppola. This was a terrible attempt on my part at using humor to snark on fuckyeahdirectors without making fuckyeahdirectors hate me even more than it probably already does.

I think she’s a talented director, even if she benefits from a incredible amount of privilege. I largely enjoy her film oeuvre. And I acknowledge that just because I’m having the worst day ever doesn’t really excuse me being grammatically ambiguous in a way that’s potentially hurtful to someone who doesn’t deserve it. I apologize to you and everyone else who was offended by this.

I’m so glad I misunderstood you!

You should do a spam of female directors, y’know, be the change you want to see, etc etc. Make it better than those typical, boring picture posts by including mini-bios and links to view their works. I’d love to contribute to that :D

I’ll start with:

Katrina Del Mar (because I haven’t written about her enough)
This “wild woman”, hailed as “the Lesbian Russ Meyer,” is a New York-based art and commercial photographer, as well as an award winning filmmaker and video artist. Her first film, Gang Girls 2000, shot entirely on super 8mm film, received a  4 ½ star review in Film Threat Magazine, and received glowing reviews from the press, even inviting comparisons to the legendary Kenneth Anger.

The follow up, Surf Gang about a gang of women surfers from Rockaway Beach in New York City, landed Katrina a prestigious Fellowship in Video from the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) and Best Experimental Film Award from the Planet Out Short Movie Awards announced at the Sundance Film Festival in 2006.
(She has since filmed another gang-girl-centric film, Hell On Wheels: Gang Girls Forever, featuring “Homeless Skateboarders, pacifist rollerskaters, vegan animal-activist bikers, dyslexics and more! EVERYTHING ON WHEELS!”)

In late 2006 Katrina del Mar landed a dream job serving as studio manager for legendary art photographer Nan Goldin, who has described Katrina’s work as “radical” and “ground-breaking.” Her client list also includes Sony Music, Island Records, Polygram, V2 Records, London Records, Time Out New York, People Magazine, Alternative Press, Mademoiselle, and the NYPost

As an artist, Katrina del Mar has shown her work at The Museum for Contemporary Art in Bordeaux, France, Deitch Projects, American Fine Arts Company, Binz 39 in Switzerland, the Bass Museum of Art in Miami, the Miami Light Project, P.S. 122 in New York City, and the University of Cardiff in Wales.

Check out her website here, and peep the trailer for Gang Girls 2000 on her YouTube channel.

What do you guys have?

women in film / inspiration / feminism / filmmaking / behind the scenes /

160 Notes 0

feministfilm:

fuckyeahdirectors:

Sofia Coppola

OH HAY EVERYBUDY IT’S ME SOFIA COPPOLA! U KNOW, THE ONLY FEMALE DIRECTOR WHO HAS EVER LIVED!?!?!

Really, feministfilm?? Snarking on a successful female filmmaker’s career by implying that she is responsible for the narrow-minded popular opinion is the slut-shaming of the directorial world. I don’t follow you to see stuff like this; this isn’t what you stand for, and this definitely isn’t what I stand for.
HEAVEN FUCKING FORBID a female director be popular enough to mindlessly name-drop ad nauseaum like her male counterparts.

feministfilm:

fuckyeahdirectors:

Sofia Coppola

OH HAY EVERYBUDY IT’S ME SOFIA COPPOLA! U KNOW, THE ONLY FEMALE DIRECTOR WHO HAS EVER LIVED!?!?!

Really, feministfilm?? Snarking on a successful female filmmaker’s career by implying that she is responsible for the narrow-minded popular opinion is the slut-shaming of the directorial world. I don’t follow you to see stuff like this; this isn’t what you stand for, and this definitely isn’t what I stand for.

HEAVEN FUCKING FORBID a female director be popular enough to mindlessly name-drop ad nauseaum like her male counterparts.

counter-productive / filmmaking / women in film /

160 Notes 0

important / independent / independent filmmakers / women in film /

4 Notes 0