An AMAZING scene from Bronson (2008), dir. by Nicolas Winding Refn

Laughing, crying, I don’t even know. Another film with a great soundtrack.

2000s / bronson / film / independent / nicolas winding refn / uk / Film /

6 Notes 0

Thoughts so far on Valhalla Rising

The entire Medieval era seems like one big ill-conceived plan. Also, nightmarishly damp.



The trailer is pretty misleading, though. This movie is so quiet and uncomfortable with very hushed, minimal dialog and very little action. The soundtrack is beautiful, ominous and drone-y pretty much wall-to-wall. I’m pretty enamored; I don’t even know how they got some of these gorgeous shots - it’s like they’re shooting underwater half of the time because of the thickness of the fog. Desolate and depressing and surreal. So far, definitely recommended.

I am not impressed, however, with this orangeish CGI bloodspray. That’s the only thing that takes me out of the story.

2000s / denmark / film / independent / uk / valhalla rising / Film /

6 Notes 0

Part one (of ten) of Dog Soldiers (2002), dir. by Neil Marshall

One of my favorite werewolf movies, featuring some awesome creature effects. Double-click on the video to watch the rest on YouTube.

2000s / film / horror / it's all up on youtube / uk / werewolves are cool / Film /

5 Notes 0

It’s a rainy, gloomy day outside - a perfect time for a mystery.

Sherlocks Holmes’ Fatal Hour (1931), dir. by Leslie S. Hiscott

This film, one of the most successful Sherlock Holmes stories of the 1930s, was lost for almost 50 years after a screening in 1955. Digitally restored in 2010 by The Video Cellar.
While I’ll always love Sherlock Holmes, though, Basil Rathbone will always be the REAL Holmes to me.

1930s / mystery / sherlock holmes / the video cellar / uk / film /

2 Notes 0

Image from Village of the Damned (1960), dir. by Wolf Rilla
I love John Carpenter, but his remake could never compare to the beauty and suspense of the original.
Quick trivia: The iconic glowing eyes of the village children was achieved by matting the negative film of their irises over the processed film. The effect is a brilliant and haunting testament to the art of pre-digital film editing.

Image from Village of the Damned (1960), dir. by Wolf Rilla

I love John Carpenter, but his remake could never compare to the beauty and suspense of the original.

Quick trivia: The iconic glowing eyes of the village children was achieved by matting the negative film of their irises over the processed film. The effect is a brilliant and haunting testament to the art of pre-digital film editing.

(Source: blamblamfever)

1960s / horror / uk / film /

18 Notes 0

Clip from The Pervert’s Guide To Cinema (2006), dir. by Sophie Fiennes, featuring Slavoj Žižek

"I want a third pill."

2000s / austria / documentary / netherlands / uk / psychoanalysis /

11 Notes 0

I’m interested.

Trailer for Hanna (2011), dir. by Joe Wright

2010s / uk / saoirse ronan / joe wright /

22 Notes 0

cinematografo:

(via meredithshizzle)
The Boat That Rocked

I did not like this movie at all. While maybe a couple of the characters were lovable (and there were some sweet, albeit brief, cameos), the plot was shoddy, the comedic elements were much more uncomfortable than funny, and the pacing was abysmal. The idea itself is so cool and based on a true story, and this is the mess Curtis made of it.Also, the saccharine twee love story made me ill.
But in all honesty, I stopped watching about 20 minutes in, so I haven’t seen the whole thing. Maybe it gets better? What did you think of it?

cinematografo:

(via meredithshizzle)

The Boat That Rocked

I did not like this movie at all. While maybe a couple of the characters were lovable (and there were some sweet, albeit brief, cameos), the plot was shoddy, the comedic elements were much more uncomfortable than funny, and the pacing was abysmal. The idea itself is so cool and based on a true story, and this is the mess Curtis made of it.
Also, the saccharine twee love story made me ill.

But in all honesty, I stopped watching about 20 minutes in, so I haven’t seen the whole thing. Maybe it gets better? What did you think of it?

2000s / pirate radio / richard curtis / the boat that rocked / uk /

10 Notes 0

Watching the Beatles documentary Let It Be (1970), directed by Michael Linsday-Hogg with my father. I’m completely enamored. Not only is this film a candid, raw account of the studio sessions leading up to the collapse of the monumental pop group, it paints a very clear picture of their relationships with eachother at the time. Lennon on smack, Yoko an ever-looming presence, the rest of the group on weed (perhaps to temper their frustration), and hours upon hours of jamming just to blow off steam.

Since The Beatles are infinitely more relevant to my father than they are to me, I’ve always felt a distinct disinterest in the group; not out of distaste for the music, rather I never felt privy to the history so I didn’t really understand their importance. The fact that Let It Be is so unobtrusive and unsensationalized helps me to see just how endearing, frustrating and human these guys really were together.

I also love how this film builds itself around all the hours The Beatles spent wasting time in the studio, as opposed to being famous and amazing. As McCartney says himself somewhere halfway through the film about their dickin’ around, “Alright lads, we could go all day,” then proceeds to goof up “The Long and Winding Road”. The purposefully meandering assembly of footage is both interesting and sad, as the film itself doesn’t seem to culminate into anything, much like the end of The Beatles’ career.

1970s / uk / documentary / the beatles / apple studios / young paul mccartney was pretty babely not even gonna lie /

8 Notes 0

die-eier-von-satan:

“Life’s a piece of shit when you look at it.”

YES.
Life of Brian (1979), directed by Terry Jones

die-eier-von-satan:

“Life’s a piece of shit when you look at it.”

YES.

Life of Brian (1979), directed by Terry Jones

(via call-of-cthulhu)

1970S / uk / monty python / my next spam? /

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