Gitcher art on~

L’Etoile de mer (1928), dir. by Man Ray
Starring Kiki de Montparnasse

france / film / movie / movies / 1920s / art / experimental / short / man ray /

25 Notes 0

Acéra or the Witches’ Dance/Le bal des sorcières (1972), dir. by Jean Painlevé and Geneviève Hamon
With music by Pierre Jansen 

1970s / france / experimental / film /

9 Notes 0

Trailer for Le Pacte des loups/Brotherhood of the Wolf (2001), dir. by Christophe Gans

Another awesome and little-known werewolf film* - this time a three-hour period piece - featuring the talented and babely Vincent Cassel as a total incestuous creeper. Perfect for a moody, rainy evening.

*I know there are lots of arguments about whether or not the Beast of Gevaudan is a werewolf, or even wolf-like. My classification of it as a “werewolf film” is really only in form; I don’t mean to pigeonhole the fantasy. This is, obviously, not at all like American Werewolf in London.

2000s / film / france / horror / werewolves are cool / Film /

5 Notes 0

qwyx-deactivated20121217 said: I don't even know how good it's going to be but it looks so pretty. It's a Jean Rollin movie so I know there's going to be a lot of sexy sexy time.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tem3TrXi3JU



This looks gorgeous~ Great find, bbgrrl!

1970s / film / france / gorgeous / jean rollin / Film /

1 Notes 0

François de Roubaix - Les Dunes D’Ostende

from the OST of Les Levres Rouges/Daughters of Darkness (1971), dir. by Harry Kümel

1970s / belgium / france / soundtrack / thank you vanny / film /

6 Notes 0

Le spectre rouge / The Red Spectre (1907), dir. by Segundo de Chomón and Ferdinand Zecca

A fantastic example of early French cinema echoing the masterful techniques of the film-magician Georges Méliès. All color in this film was hand-tinted frame by frame.

france / 1900s / early cinema /

12 Notes 0

fraternalfilms:

The first image he told me about was of three children on a road in Iceland, in 1965. He said that for him it was the image of happiness and also that he had tried several times to link it to other images, but it never worked. He wrote me: one day I’ll have to put it all alone at the beginning of a film with a long piece of black leader; if they don’t see happiness in the picture, at least they’ll see the black.
Sans Soleil by Chris Marker

One of my favorite films. Sans Soleil really pushes the boundaries between film montage and documentary, between reality and dreams. So so so powerful.

fraternalfilms:

The first image he told me about was of three children on a road in Iceland, in 1965. He said that for him it was the image of happiness and also that he had tried several times to link it to other images, but it never worked. He wrote me: one day I’ll have to put it all alone at the beginning of a film with a long piece of black leader; if they don’t see happiness in the picture, at least they’ll see the black.

Sans Soleil by Chris Marker

One of my favorite films. Sans Soleil really pushes the boundaries between film montage and documentary, between reality and dreams. So so so powerful.

1980s / france / chris marker / sans soleil /

4 Notes 0

Just watched The Secret of Kells (2009), by Tomm Moore and Nora Twomey.

Completely blown away by this gorgeous animation! The story itself is a fictionalized account of an actual document, the Book of Kells, an illuminated manuscript known to be one of Ireland’s greatest national treasures.
Drawing heavily from Celtic mythology (as indicated not only in the script, but in the extremely detailed animation) as well as historical events and characters, The Secret of Kells is a wonder to behold, falling short in only one category: pacing. Everything seems to be overcome quite easily, even the epic (and stunning) metaphysical battle between our main character Brendan and the dark pagan deity Crom Cruach.
I wish I could give a stronger argument for that, but the rest of the film is just so beautiful that this is one of those rare times where I can forgive pacing and ease-of-overcoming-obstacles. Animations aren’t usually known for their realistic pacing to begin with, considering their run-times rarely exceed 80 minutes. All in all, highly recommended!

2000s / animation / ireland / belgium / france /

1 Notes 0

One of my favorite scenes in Carl Th. Dreyer’s The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928), score brilliantly composed by Richard Einhorn in 1994, performed by the Anonymous 4 and the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic

The set and lighting design in this film is phenomenal. The part where the priest steps into the window’s light and the cross immediately fades gives me chills all over. Definitely one of the most beautiful films I’ve ever seen.

1920s / france / carl th. dreyer / the passion of joan of arc / richard einhorn / voices of light / favorite /

13 Notes 0

Saw this last night. Blew. My. Mind.

Henri-Georges Clouzot’s Inferno (2009), directed by Serge Bromberg and Ruxandra Medrea

Part documentary, part reconstruction, this film combines stunning technicolor screen tests and endless takes in black and white with testimonials from the cast and crew of what it was like to witness this brilliant, mad director dissolve into obsession. In many ways, the story of L’Infer played out much like its filming, and its director’s own faults (and vice many versas).

It’s such a goddamn shame L’inferwas never completed, because the screen tests alone would’ve been enough to dazzle me for hours. The fortuitous nature of how this film came to be, however, is a great story of its own; trapped in an elevator for two hours with Clouzot’s widow, Inès, and learning that she possessed all the footage of L’infer, which hadn’t been touched in over 30 years.

Super-highly recommended.

2000s / documentary / favorite / france / experimental / psychological thriller / 1960s /

11 Notes 0